Archive for May, 2011

House Appropriations Committee Votes To Defund USDA Inspections of Horse Slaughter Plants.
May 31, 2011

From the range, to the slaughter chute: our nation's mustangs.

Today’s good news and photographs, courtesy of: American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign

UPDATE (5/31/11, p.m.): Your calls did it, the House of Representatives Appropriations Committee voted 24 to 21 in favor of Congressman Moran’s amendment which continues the defunding of horse slaughter plant inspections.  The defunding of slaughter plant inspections is the reason horses are currently not slaughtered in the U.S.

Your calls made it happen!  This evening, Tuesday, May 31, 2011, at 6 p.m. the U.S. House of Representatives Appropriations Committee voted in favor (24-21) of Congressman Jim Moran’s amendment to the Agriculture Appropriations Bill to prohibit federal funding for USDA inspections of horse slaughter plants. The final Appropriations bill will still need to pass the full House and Senate before becoming law, but today’s Committee vote is an important first step in the fight to prevent the re-establishment of horse slaughter plants in the U.S. 

Without federal funding for USDA inspections, horse slaughter plants producing horse meat for human consumption cannot operate in the U.S.!

A BIG thank you to advocates across the country who stepped up to make calls today to voice opposition to the resumption of horse slaughter in the U.S.

As you know, the threat of commercial slaughter always looms large over the heads of the tens of thousands of mustangs who have been removed from the range and are stockpiled in government holding pens and pastures. Today’s victory is important in the battle to protect horses – both wild and domestic – from the unspeakably cruel fate of being sold for slaughter to become horsemeat to supply foreign markets.

For more information about this situation and Congressman Moran’s amendment, please click here.

Our deep appreciation goes to Congressman Moran who has been a longtime champion of wild horses and burros and who fights many tough battles for what is fair and just.

You Made The Difference!! THANK YOU FOR TAKING ACTION TO PROTECT AMERICA’S HORSES.

Thank you, American Wild Horse Preservation Campaign, for all YOU do.

Horses tagged for slaughter.

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This.
May 28, 2011

Courtesy of: The Left Handers Club.

Click here: Left Handers Club Newsletter – Anything Left-Handed

Left-handed Prime Minister and President get together.

Left handed US President Barack Obama is currently in London visiting Left-handed UK Prime Minister David Cameron. Apart from all the serious business at hand, they found time for a game of table tennis (both left-handed of course) at the Globe Academy in South London.

President Obama also met another fellow left-hander, Prince William, just getting over one of the most high-profile weddings of the year.

Click here for more left-handed leaders

Fairy Dust or Hard Work?
May 27, 2011

Ernest Hemingway's desk in his house in Key West.

So the writer can only do his or her part to the best of his ability and place himself in the best position for the next steps. There are ways to get noticed, but still no guarantees.

Editor Beth Hill    Click here: Editor’s Blog  

Exactly.

I’m of the camp that believes a writer can make their own luck through hard, hard work. In a sense, the first part of an author’s career is an apprenticeship to Writing. To experiment, practice, (and above all), write. Again, dare to suck. The only way to write amazing, get-noticed material is through writing dull stuff, wrong stuff, first drafts, embarassing ideas, the grocery list, if necessary, as long as you keep the pen (or keyboard) moving.

When we write, we train our brains to write. To think. To create. It’s no different than anything else we do, from drawing, knitting, riding, *fill in the blank*. We don’t draw perfect people, knit perfect sweaters, gallop and sidestep right out of the gate. First, we learn. We practice, put in the hours. Study what those further ahead of us know. Be willing to fail. But, also be willing to get back up, get back to the page.

Neither magical thinking  nor daydreams of ones books on the shelves will make it happen over the long haul. The best tool a writer has is hard work — to keep writing — to persevere.

Every day is a new page.