Archive for the ‘My Novel Sold!’ Category

If You Find Me ARC GIVEAWAY LINKS and Insider Surprise!
June 28, 2012

I’m not sure I’m allowed to be posting some of this stuff, but if you don’t tell, I won’t either, winks.

We’ll get to that in a moment.

First off, THANK YOU to everyone who made my new title and cover reveal such a success! Watching the tweets and retweets roll in, on such short notice, was amazing. Happy tears! So much gratitude for your wonderful efforts, for caring, for helping me out last minute, and for your kindnesses — not only my writing friends, but writers I didn’t know before today, and even complete strangers, jumped in to help!

Magic was in the air! I felt buoyed up by kindred spirits, all of us united over our love of books!

As some of you know, my cover reveal wasn’t supposed to happen until July 24th. But, someone at the publisher uploaded my cover by mistake. It seems once a cover is uploaded onto amazon.com, it spreads like wildfire.

Even I, myself, hadn’t seen the final mock up. Due to a few last minute changes, the cover on Amazon, Shelfari, and other assorted sites wasn’t even the final copy.

These things happen, sometimes. Here’s what it looked like:

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I’m lucky my agents and my editor are so wonderful, and when I told them I’d like my name after my title, and the blurb below or on top of the book, they obliged. And the pink letters … hmmm … were returned back to the original yellow, for the final cover revealed today:

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Now, so many of you loved the original title, The Patron Saint of Beans. A few writers even planned to start a letter writing campaign to St. Martin’s asking to keep it. : ) This next cover, for posterity, is for YOU (and you know who you are)!

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Lastly, I was lucky to get a glimpse of my title page, one of the first pages you’ll see when you open the actual book. I can’t tell you how many times I’ve looked at the cool little griffin icon, or other publishers’ logos/icons, and dreamed of it being on a page of my own book, some day.

And even better yet, I have the image to share!

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Thank you to everyone who made this day so special! All my friends, writing friends, our 2013 debut novels group The Lucky 13s, Mandy Hubbard, Bob Diforio, my agency siblings, everyone!

And you do know there are signed ARCs of If You Find Me for you to win, right?

You can enter here:

ARC Giveaway and Cover Interview written by my agent, Mandy Hubbard! Read about what she thought when she first read IYFM, her offer of representation, how the editor offers went down, etc!

Pub(lishing) Crawl | Reading you under the table since 2012

ARC Giveaway and Author Interview at Tasha’s blog: patron saint of beans « Gypsyscarlett’s Weblog

ARC Giveaway and Cover Reveal at Kristi’s blog: The Story Siren

ARC Giveaway at Kari’s blog: A Good Addiction: Exclusive Cover + Title Reveal + Contest: Emily Murdoch’s Upcoming YA

Cover Reveal at Becky’s blog: Becky’s Book Reviews: Cover Reveal: If You Find Me

ARC Giveaway at Kerry’s blog: Free Arc Giveaway for “If You Find Me” | KerrySchafer.com

ARC Giveaway at Cate’s blog: Going from Nobody to Somebody: COVER REVEAL + Giveaway!

ARC Giveaway and Interview at Lisa’s blog: The Young Adult Connection: COVER REVEAL: If You Find me by Emily Murdoch

Cover Reveal at fellow Lucky 13’er, Elsie Chapman’s, blog: emily murdoch « Elsie Chapman

(And while you’re at Elsie’s blog, check out the recently revealed cover to her amazing 2013 debut, DUALED!)

Cover Reveal at Katie’s blog: Breath of Books: Cover: If You Find Me by Emily Murdoch

Cover Reveal at Julie Butcher’s blog: Julie Butcher

“No man is poor, who has friends.” ~It’s A Wonderful Life

I’m surely the richest person in the world, today.

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Copy Edits.
May 22, 2012

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(Firstly, I’m still trying to figure out if “copyedits” is one word or two!)

When I received my copyedits a few weeks ago, I was not unlike other starry-eyed writers navigating the many stages of publishing, (stages we may have dreamt about), for the very first time.

Was it magical? Sure! Exciting? You bet! There’ll never be another first copy edits, I reminded myself, so soak up this moment! Suck out the marrow! Embrace how far you’ve come! (And the fact that you’re still somewhat sane!)

But I can’t deny it was equal parts terrifying.

Just as another writer friend expressed, I circled that chubby package of hard-copy copyedits “as if it were a wild animal”. I had a deadline of May 23rd, and could ask for more time, if needed.

Good thing, I thought sheepishly, as I lost the entire first week to nerves. Only, I’d never missed a deadline before, and wasn’t planning to this time, either. We’re professionals, after all.

Some say during copyedits, a writer’s secret weapon is STET: don’t change. Keep as written. But it’s also a lot of power … the power to be nearsighted as a writer, in a bid to keep things “your way” … the power for your book to hum instead of sing because you failed to avail yourself of the sharp, professional minds surrounding your work. Sure, it can be difficult to let go of your pet words and phrases. But what the best publishing teams want is for their writers to shine, not twinkle in mediocrity.

Agent Betsy Lerner says it best in her book, The Forest for the Trees, An Editor’s Advice to Writers.

While all the meetings are going on, the manuscript is also being physically prepared for publication. It will be copyedited, a process that the best writers appreciate. I have authors who insist on using the copyeditor they worked with previously, so profound is their respect for that person’s careful eye and command of grammar, punctuation, syntax, and other nuances of language, and so deep their gratitude for having been spared embarrassing errors. For the writer who truly loves language, a trip to the copyeditor is like a week at Canyon Ranch spa. You come out looking younger, trimmer, and better groomed, and standing straighter … In general, copyeditors are unsung heroes, the men and women who stand as the last line of defense against the fall of civilization, so fierce and exacting is their protection of the English language.

That’s exactly how I feel about my copyeditor, so grateful am I for her deft touch.

Not only have I lived to tell, but I emerge from this experience more confident, standing straighter, and so does the writing (as it makes its way to NYC on time).

Thank you, Carol Edwards, copyeditor extraordinaire!

Sold Dutch and German Rights For The Patron Saint Of Beans!
March 5, 2012

The official post. : )

Here it is, from Publisher’s Marketplace:

International rights: Fiction
Rights to Emily Murdoch’s THE PATRON SAINT OF BEANS, to Heyne in Germany, by Agence Hoffman, and Van Goor in the Netherlands, by Mo Literary Services, on behalf of Taryn Fagerness Agency and Mandy Hubbard of D4EO Agency.

I couldn’t be more excited at the thought of sharing my novel abroad. It’s looking like it’ll come out in the Netherlands approximately Summer 2013, and I’m not sure yet of the date for Germany.

I can’t wait to hold these two versions in my hands, even if I can’t read them, myself!

I wish all writers the same good fortune and this same amazing feeling.

Last but far from least, a huge thank you to Taryn Fagerness and her sub-agents, and to Mandy Hubbard, and Bob Diforio. I’m luckiest of all to be in such capable, wonderful hands. : )

“The harder I worked, the luckier I got.”

Paula Deen

My Novel Sold To St. Martin’s Griffin! : ) Part One.
January 25, 2012

What’s been saved in my work inbox for 14 months, 8 weeks, 4 days:
This one, I wrote to myself. (A writer can dream, winks.)
Dear Emily,
 We’ve received FIVE offers from editors at amazing NYC publishing houses!
 
They love your novel and we’re looking at a significant deal, a multi-book contract and Oprah wants the novel for her book club.
 
Good work! More information to follow,
 
Agent Extraordinaire
I came across this quote below, and although I’m spiritual, not religious, I found it beautiful — both reassuring and strengthening. At times it feels like divine intervention alone is how one gets published. Maybe it is. I did do an awful lot of petitioning of my dead friend and dead grandmothers. Sometimes all we want to know is that we’re on the right path.
Hope is a golden cord connecting you to heaven.  This cord helps you hold your head up high, even when multiple trials are buffeting you.  I never leave your side, and I never let go of your hand.  But without the cord of hope, your head may slump and your feet may shuffle as you journey uphill with Me. Hope lifts your perspective from your weary feet to the glorious view you can see from the high road.  You are reminded that the road we’re traveling together is ultimately a highway to heaven.  When you consider this radiant destination, the roughness or smoothess of the road ahead becomes much less significant.  I am training you to hold in your heart a dual focus: My continual Presence and the hope of heaven. 
 
Romans 12:12; Thessalonians 5:8; Hebrews 6:18-19.
The next is just plain-old lovely.
“Be who God meant you to be,
and you will set the world on fire.”
 
St. Catherine of Sienna
I’ve been trying and trying to write this post, to no avail. I’m not one of those writers who (beforehand) imagines writing a post like this. Truth be told, I find myself feeling quite shy about it. How shy? As shy as reading your diary to a crowd. Yeah, that shy. Welcome to my head. Watch your step.
Agent Bob Diforio’s blurb stays in my inbox, also, because after years and years of rejection, I keep reading it as a reality check. To make sure this is real.

Christmas came early for debut literary YA novelist Emily Murdoch. In a spirited submission  creating buzz among dozens of editors, publishers and publicity people who quickly read her extraordinary novel, THE PATRON SAINT OF BEANS, it was Jennifer Weis of St. Martin’s who carried the day for North American Rights;  sold by Bob Diforio and Mandy Hubbard of D4EO Literary Agency.

Emily was inspired to write the novel after reading about a mother who kidnapped her son and fled to Brazil. In “Beans”, violin prodigy Carey Blackburn and her mute little sister, Jenessa, have spent their entire lives in a broken-down camper deep in the forest of a national park, forced to cope with their drug-addicted mother only sporadically on hand, until they are rescued by a father they don’t know and learn the truth about their early childhood. As they adjust to the real world of school, malls and other children – especially boys – Carey is weighed down by a dark secret that threatens the only good luck she’s ever known.

A brilliant YA novel with adult cross-over appeal, editors found the work both moving and magical.

I didn’t realize that even praise can take some getting used to. Which is how I came to realize what was holding me back from writing this post: the entanglement of personal and public feelings.
Once I agreed to publish, my book became itself — a separate entity increasingly out  of my control.
Let’s look back. I was one of those people admonished as a child for being too sensitive — as if sensitivity were a negative thing. (Sensitive child in your midst? You may just have an artist on your hands. Celebrate that fact, that sensitivity. A child could do worse than to possess a deeply feeling heart.)
I’m also one of those people who keeps my feelings close to the vest. And what I feel about selling The Patron Saint Of Beans to St. Martin’s Griffin is a feeling so personal, profound, and public all at the same time, that it remains gestational in its development. For all intensive purposes, it’s a baby novel. I’m a baby author. All the words are new.
But what I can articulate is that however many years I’m lucky to live, this will remain one of the most amazingly awesome moments of my life.
On to the story.

The two weeks preceding December 19th, 2011 (the date of my sale) were an amazing whirlwind of hope, praise, editor reads and offers, telephone conferences with editors and pinch-me-hard moments.

I was subbed to both adult and young adult editors. I had offers from both adult and young adult editors. At one point, when I thought we’d settled on a publisher/editor and my agents informed the other editors, they said no!

They wouldn’t take no for an answer!

And so more offers came in. A pre-empt came and went. Choices, choices, choices, from no, no, no’s. I felt like a character in a novel whose obstacles had been removed. Reality was so surreal, such a rocket ride, such a blessed, lucky, thank-you-Universe kind of moment, I couldn’t believe it was happening to me.

When I was seven-years-old and in the midst of reading every single book in the elementary school library, I used to imagine my books on the school library shelves, not in the bookstores. Books to transport eager, earnest children into parallel worlds of dark and light. Books poking like crocuses through the snow, opening curious hearts and minds to worlds where underdogs prevailed, where obstacles existed for good reason: to grow a person deeper, stronger, taller. Pages. Places where anything was — IS — possible.

What an amazing thing to be a part of.

If you’d like to add my novel on Goodreads, or friend me, please go here: Goodreads

I believe the good things happen to us so we can pay it forward. A portion of the proceeds of “Beans” will benefit Taylor Hendrix’s Christmas Project.

Sixteen-year-old Taylor, battling osteosarcoma, gathers gifts in backpacks each Christmas to brighten the spirits of cancer teens in hospital over the holidays. For more information, see my previous post: Taylor’s Christmas Project.

Part Two to follow …